Afghan Girls Education

Sara Assefi

The Talibans backtracked on their announcement that high schools would open for girls? On March 17th, 2022 students attend a graduation ceremony at Benawa University in Kandahar Afghanistan. A total of 193 students, including 30 females, graduated from three faculties of computer science and engineering at Benawa University in Kandahar. The IEA closed some schools until a plan was drawn up in accordance with Islamic law for them to reopen. Taliban officials said Monday that they would allow all students — including girls at the secondary education level — to attend classes beginning Wednesday, the start of the Afghan new year. But just as the girls turned up to their school gates, they were sent home by Taliban officials who told them to wait for an official announcement. One senior official insisted the Taliban had not reneged but needed more time to decide on a school uniform for teenage girls. The Quran commands all Muslims, regardless of gender, to read, think, contemplate, and pursue knowledge, and the Prophet Muhammad encouraged education as a religious duty for both males and females. One of the most important rights granted to women by Islam is the right to education and gain knowledge. The IEA and leader promised education. These cultural attitudes are often masqueraded as religious ideals. But Islam is a faith that improved the position of women in 7th-century Arabian society, and many Muslims are confident that this spirit of reform was meant to continue. The Taliban’s leaders are well aware that the world’s eyes are on them, particularly watchful of their handling of women’s rights. They have not announced any nationwide ban on women’s schooling – just that it will resume once “security concerns” are addressed. Yet, with the Taliban’s track record, this delay could carry on for months or years on end. These “security concerns” may amount to high-level leaders’ fears that their soldiers, many of whom are uneducated and deeply steeped in patriarchal customs, may not comply with orders to allow women safe passage to school.

 

Sara Assefi